Eric Findlay CIRP, LIT, CPA

Licensed Insolvency Trustee, Senior Vice President

Servicing:



<p><strong>Eric Findlay, CPA, CIRP, LIT</strong>, is a Senior Vice President and Licensed Insolvency Trustee with MNP in Halifax. A specialist in the Consumer Insolvency and Corporate Recovery and Restructuring groups, Eric has more than 14 years of experience in the insolvency industry and offers advice to a wide range of clients, including owner-managed businesses, financial institutions, professionals and individuals.</p>
<p>Eric consults with and advises on clients&rsquo; options and helps them navigate their way through difficult financial situations with respect and compassion. He has experience with informal workouts, formal proposals and Companies&rsquo; Creditors Arrangement Act (CCAA) proceedings.</p>
<p>In addition to assisting business owners and individuals, Eric works with lending institutions to review troubled accounts to minimize their exposure and when necessary, maximize recoveries. He has experience in roles such as consultant, trustee, receiver and receiver-manager under court and private appointments.</p>
<p>Eric is a Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA) a Chartered Insolvency and Restructuring Professional (CIRP) and a Licensed Insolvency Trustee (LIT) since 2012. He is a past board member of the Canadian Association of Insolvency and Restructuring Professionals.</p>

Recent Blogs

 

 

Nobody enjoys being delinquent on their bills. But unfortunately, it’s not always possible to make ends meet.

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You’ve done everything you can to provide a good life for your family. You‘ve worked hard to put a roof over their head, food on the table, clothing on their backs – to make sure they’ll never want for anything.

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YES! Of course you can still buy things after you file for bankruptcy; in fact, one of the most attractive benefits of a bankruptcy is that you are free from all of the unsecured debt payments you were previously making and as a result; you will likely have more discretionary spending money compared to before your bankruptcy.

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